Vaccinating without complete willingness against COVID-19: Personal and social aspects of Israeli nursing students and faculty members.

Vaccinating without complete willingness against COVID-19: Personal and social aspects of Israeli nursing students and faculty members.

Publication date: Sep 20, 2023

Soon after the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic outbreak, it became clear that vaccination will be the most useful tool to combat the disease. Despite the apparent safety and efficacy of the developed anti-COVID-19 vaccines, relatively high percentages of the population worldwide refused to get vaccinated, including many health workers and health students. The present cross-sectional study examined the motives, attitudes, and personal characteristics of those who did not get vaccinated against COVID-19 or vaccinated without complete willingness among nursing students and nursing faculty members in Israel (nā€‰=ā€‰472). Results show that the vast majority of the study participants (97%) received at least one dose of the anti-COVID-19 vaccine. Nearly 37% of the participants indicated that they received the vaccine without complete willingness. As compared to faculty members, nursing students reported lower trust in the efficacy of the vaccine, perceived the COVID-19 pandemic as a health threat to a lesser extent, exhibited lower institutional and personal trust, and had higher levels of posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms. Non-Jewish participants were at risk of vaccinating without complete willingness. These findings underscore the need for developing evidence-based strategies to promote the safety and efficacy of the anti-COVID-19 vaccines in nursing schools.

Concepts Keywords
Coronavirus complete willingness
Faculty COVID-19 vaccine
Jewish nursing faculties
Pandemic nursing students
Vaccinating pandemic
PTSD
trust

Semantics

Type Source Name
disease MESH COVID-19
disease VO vaccination
disease VO population
disease VO vaccinated
disease VO dose
disease VO COVID-19 vaccine
disease VO vaccine
disease MESH posttraumatic stress disorder

Original Article

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