The Disproportionate Effects of the COVID-19 Pandemic on the Time Allocation of Recipients of NIH Career Development Awards Who Are Women or Caregivers of Dependents.

Publication date: Mar 07, 2024

To understand time allocation of a national medical faculty cohort 1. 5-2 years after the COVID-19 pandemic began, compared to before. From August 2021-April 2022, the authors conducted a retrospective survey of 1,430 clinician-researchers who received National Institutes of Health career-development awards between 2006-2009 asking about domestic and professional time allocation pre-pandemic and at the time of surveys (TOS). Of 915 respondents (64%), the 830 who remained in academic positions constituted the analytic sample. Multivariable regression models identified demographic factors associated with each time outcome and change in time between pre-pandemic and TOS, and having experienced ≥8-hour increase of total self-reported weekly professional work hours and domestic labor hours. Median self-reported weekly professional work hours were 55 hours/week pre- pandemic and 60 at TOS. On multivariable analysis, significant predictors of self-reported weekly professional work hours at TOS were having a non-child other dependent (+2. 6 hours, P = .03), academic rank (associate -3. 1 hours, assistant -9. 0 hours; P < .001), and specialty (P < .001). Average self-reported TOS weekly domestic-labor hours were 23. 1 among men and 30. 2 among women (P < .001). Predictors of total self-reported TOS weekly domestic hours were being a woman (+5. 6 hours; P < .001) and having children requiring supervision (+10. 2 hours; P < .001). Overall, 9. 3% of men (42/450) and 21. 6% of women (88/407) experienced a ≥ 8 hour increase in domestic labor (P < .001). On multivariable analysis, women had higher odds of substantial domestic-labor increase (OR = 2. 33, 95% CI: 1. 47, 3. 68), as did those with children requiring supervision (OR = 1. 93, 95% CI: 1. 25, 2. 98) or other dependents (OR = 1. 83, 95% CI: 1. 13, 2. 98). This study illuminates demands on women and faculty with dependents during the COVID-19 pandemic and suggests increased flexibility and resources are of heightened importance.

Concepts Keywords
Academic Allocation
Caregivers Covid
Pandemic Dependents
Domestic
Hours
Labor
Multivariable
Pandemic
Pre
Professional
Reported
Self
Tos
Weekly
Women

Semantics

Type Source Name
disease MESH COVID-19 Pandemic
disease VO time

Original Article

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