Projecting the long-term effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on U.S. population structure.

Projecting the long-term effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on U.S. population structure.

Publication date: Mar 18, 2024

The immediate, direct effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on the United States population are substantial. Millions of people were affected by the pandemic: many died, others did not give birth, and still others could not migrate. Research that has examined these individual phenomena is important, but fragmented. The disruption of mortality, fertility, and migration jointly affected U. S. population counts and, consequently, future population structure. We use data from the United Nations World Population Prospects and the cohort component projection method to isolate the effect of the pandemic on U. S. population estimates until 2060. If the pandemic had not occurred, we project that the population of the U. S. would have 2. 1 million (0. 63%) more people in 2025, and 1. 7 million (0. 44%) more people in 2060. Pandemic-induced migration changes are projected to have a larger long-term effect on future population size than mortality, despite comparable short-term effects.

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Concepts Keywords
Covid Affected
Died Covid
Migration Future
Pandemic Immediate
Long
Migration
Mortality
Pandemic
Population
Projecting
Structure
Term
United

Semantics

Type Source Name
disease VO Tax
drug DRUGBANK Coenzyme M
disease IDO country
disease VO ProHIBiT
disease MESH death
disease MESH shock
disease VO population
disease MESH COVID-19 pandemic

Original Article

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