The perceived helpfulness and acceptability of a bespoke psychological therapy service for registered nurses experiencing psychological distress: A qualitative study.

The perceived helpfulness and acceptability of a bespoke psychological therapy service for registered nurses experiencing psychological distress: A qualitative study.

Publication date: Mar 19, 2024

To understand the perceived helpfulness and acceptability of a bespoke psychological therapy service for registered nurses. The service provided a free and confidential specialist mental health service to all healthcare professionals, including nurses and nursing students. An exploratory study using a descriptive qualitative approach. A purposive sample of 20 registered nurses accessing a bespoke psychological therapy service in Wales participated in audio-recorded semi-structured interviews in January 2022. Transcribed data were analysed using reflexive thematic analysis. Four interrelated themes were identified from the data analysis: COVID [SARS-CoV-2] changed things; You’re a nurse, you’re human; I’ve got ‘me’ back; and pretty close to miracle workers. Participants attempted to live up to an idealized image of a nurse, generating self-stigmatizing beliefs that negatively affected their mental health. The psychological therapy service enabled participants to put their roles into perspective, that is, separate themselves from their role, be vulnerable, and develop confidence and adaptive coping strategies. Participants valued the minimal barriers and ease of access to support. The complex relationship between nurse identity and the challenges of the workplace needs to be central to nurse education. Nurses can benefit from rapid access to a timely, confidential, and independent self-referring psychological therapy service. This qualitative study explored the helpfulness and accessibility of psychological support for nurses. The main themes were that COVID changed things; You’re a nurse, you’re human; I’ve got ‘me’ back; and pretty close to miracle workers. The findings will impact how nurses are supported in the United Kingdom and worldwide. This report adheres to the standards for reporting qualitative research (SRQR). No patient or public contribution.

Concepts Keywords
Interviews mental health
January nurse well-being
Nurses psychological distress
Stigmatizing psychological support
Wales qualitative descriptive study
stigma

Semantics

Type Source Name
disease MESH psychological distress
disease VO report

Original Article

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