Intimate Partner Violence and Human Trafficking Screening and Services in Primary Care Across Underserved Communities in the United States-Initial Examination of Trends, 2020-2021.

Publication date: Apr 01, 2024

The Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) began collecting data on intimate partner violence (IPV) and human trafficking (HT) in the 2020 Uniform Data System (UDS). We examined patients affected by IPV and HT served by HRSA-funded health centers in medically underserved US communities during the COVID-19 pandemic. We established a baseline and measured trends in patient care by analyzing data from the 2020 (N = 28 590 897) and 2021 (N = 30 193 278) UDS. We conducted longitudinal ordinal logistic regression analyses to assess the association of care trends and organization-level and patient characteristics using proportional odds ratios (PORs) and 95% CIs. The number of clinical visits for patients affected by IPV and HT decreased by 29. 4% and 88. 3%, respectively, from 2020 to 2021. Health centers serving a higher (vs lower) percentage of pediatric patients were more likely to continuously serve patients affected by IPV (POR = 2. 58; 95% CI, 1. 01-6. 61) and HT (POR = 6. 14; 95% CI, 2. 06-18. 29). Health centers serving (vs not serving) patients affected by IPV were associated with a higher percentage of patients who had limited English proficiency (POR = 1. 77; 95% CI, 1. 02-3. 05) and Medicaid beneficiaries (POR = 2. 88; 95% CI, 1. 48-5. 62), whereas health centers serving (vs not serving) patients affected by HT were associated with a higher percentage of female patients of reproductive age (POR = 15. 89; 95% CI, 1. 61-157. 38) and urban settings (POR = 1. 74; 95% CI, 1. 26-2. 37). The number of clinical visits for patients affected by IPV and HT during the COVID-19 pandemic declined. Delayed care will pose challenges for future health care needs of these populations.

Concepts Keywords
Medicaid COVID-19 pandemic
Trafficking health centers
Underserved human trafficking
intimate partner violence
primary care
underserved communities

Semantics

Type Source Name
disease MESH Violence
disease MESH COVID-19 pandemic
disease VO organization
disease MESH limited English proficiency

Original Article

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